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20110701
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Search Results 90 to 107 of about 123 (some duplicates have been removed)
WETA
Jul 20, 2011 7:00pm EDT
: julie r.o.v.er in of npr, thanks so much. >> you're welcome. >> ifill: now to the third in our series of reports from indonesia, where developing a male contraceptive is the new face of family planning. ray suarez reports. >> reporter: it doesn't look like much: six-feet tall, a leafy shrub growing amid the lush foliage of an indonesian forest. but a chemical locked in these leaves could become a useful tool for limiting population growth here in indonesia and potentially around the globe. to get to the plants, it's a one-hour hike or a white- knuckled motorcycle ride up a steep mountain path across two rickety wooden bridges. the plant is called gandarusa and its medicinal qualities have been known to people here for centuries. traditionally, it has been brewed into an herbal remedy for stress to calm the nerves. but for a long time, there had been talk of an unexpected side effect: reduced fertility. now researchers in surabaya, on the eastern edge of the island of java, are drying the leaves, chopping them up, extracting the active chemical, and putting it in capsule form to
CSPAN
Jul 10, 2011 9:00pm EDT
" and we've done a book with david folken clothe flick who is an npr reporter with a collection of essays again taking this subject beyond the film's limitationlimitation. it can in a visceral way to get you the story but can only tell you so much. these essays in these books tell you more fully what's going on with media today, especially digital print, what the future might look like. >> and i know i said just two more but we've got one more to look at. and this is the unquiet american. rob, it's over on the wall there if you can get that. richard holbrooke. >> well, this is a book that we're very proud to be involved with. richard holbrooke's widow came to us, a bunch of people, and said, you know, we think you guys would be perfect to put together a book that really captur
FOX News
Jul 14, 2011 5:00pm EDT
and vets. how are we going to take care of them? no one is talking about green initiatives or npr. that is the only two things we care about are those things then cut everything else. that is the solution. >> bob: we just got a piece in here. to show how it's going to ignite. >> greg: you didn't hear a word i said. >> bob: i did. it was fine until the green thing. press secretary that dana used to hold that job and the current press secretary carney talking about an issue with a reporter and not in good spirit. >> in theory, would it also be that the meetings be held in other places? i suppose they could be. but if we felt like they should be we'd be there. ask me a question that makes sense and i can answer. >> eric: oooh. >> bob: have you gotten close to saying that? >> dana: i remember the feeling -- trying to think of who is he looking at there is a seating chart. i remember the feeling of immense frustration. jay carney used to be a reporter asked questions like that. if you are at the podium every day you can get frustrated and pop off at somebody. i remember i did it one ti
NBC
Jul 30, 2011 12:35am EDT
a chamomile tea? >> yeah. [ laughter ] i listen to -- >> jimmy: listen to npr. >> i listen to the music. like i got headphones on, i listen to my music and i'm just kind of relaxed. >> jimmy: what songs are you going out to? do you have a favorite one? >> i listen to all -- all kinds, man. >> jimmy: maybe ben e. king. maybe a little "stand by me" would be a good one. you could to that -- a little ben e. king. [ singing ] ♪ when the night >> jimmy: yeah. ♪ has come and the land is dark ♪ [ laughter ] ♪ and the moon is the only light we'll see ♪ >> jimmy: oh, come on! right there! that's what i'm talking about. [ cheers and applause ] my man, that was good. that was great! [ applause ] now when -- i got say this. the chuck liddell fight -- i have to bring it up, because this is insane. you got advice from randy couture. >> yeah. before that fight, like i'm always like nervous pervous before my fights. like, like, i wouldn't fight if i didn't get nervous. but that fight i was really nervous cause it was my first time really like stepping up to fighting a big name like chuck
MSNBC
Jul 15, 2011 12:00pm EDT
told npr he's in favor of raising the debt ceiling in return for spending restraint. do but regret signing that pledge? >> the pledge in question is a pledge not to raise taxes. the problem in washington is they spend too much. and that needs to be the solution. we've got to attack the overspending. >> do you see repealing tax cuts the same as raising taxes? >> the house republican budget actually proposes to rid ourselves of quite a few loopholes and lower the rate and have a net no new revenue. but republicans aren't against new revenue. we do that by getting washington off the backs of job creators across america and get this economy going again. we have a problem. the economy is going the wrong way. send spending is going up. the president has to request a huge debt increase. >> that's all happening under the bush era tax cuts. you're arguing that those tax cuts are what sparked job creation, we know we've seen the highest unemployment rate in generation under those bush era tax cuts. we know that american corporations are sitting on a lot of cash. >> ma'am -- >> we know that t
CSPAN
Jul 31, 2011 12:40am EDT
more. npr may be. you filter your sources and surround yourself with people who are your fellow conservatives. libertarians or whatever we are borg you -- everything gets filtered through that. because we are so tribal we also feel good about this like we are right and they are wrong. not that we are right. we are morally right and we are better than them and everybody does this. including scientist. every scientist would love for his eerie to be true. it is how you advance your career and how you move up the academic ladder and you have made an important discovery. so of course, scientists are going to be usually subject to do the confirmation bias. i guess we will talk about bias in science. is a problem, but it is a bigger problem in all the other areas of life religion, politics, economics and social attitudes because it leaves science has a systematic way of getting out the truth and trying to avoid those kinds of cognitive biases. it is not perfect but if you don't look for your disconfirming evidence i can assure you somebody else will usually with great glee in a public
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 7:00am EDT
control fate. a little humility. and greek drama -- you can learn a lot about sophocles. host: npr has aw series has awho serves." a piece -- the decision to enlist offers direction. . opfc, 23 from connecticut playing with his bomb sniffing dog. he was then a few bar fight before his mother jokingly suggested he fight for his country and the next day he enlisted the marine corps. it profiles of other young man who found direction and focus. could that be a focus? guest: of course. i love that stuff. i hear from my students. you wouldn't think that as a service academy you would not have -- which is graduated one. i love this guy to death. he is in the basic of the were the demolition school for seals. he has wanted to be a seal ever since he got direction. lessas kind of thing root kid. he graduated the top 20 or 30 of his class. and it gives direction. absolutely, that can be a reason. but once again, it cannot be curdled, as i say, as milk curdles. it can be curbed by telling these -- guys and gals that they are better -- the civilians are paying for you to become the type of person yo
ABC
Jul 15, 2011 2:35am EDT
wondering where the government can dustststs. the npr came up with one idea. >> each day the u.s. treasury mints nearly $2 million in coins. coins that mostly go directly into storage. abc's john karl checked it out. >> reporter: we took a journey to the u.s. mint in philadelphia where they seem to haveore doors than "get martsmart." for a lesson in how the government is losing money by making money. it sounds a little bit like las vegas around here except the coins never stop coming. this is the presidential dollar coin. congress ordered the mint to make millions of them to honor every dead president. but nobody seems to want them. rutherford b. hayes. off the press, literally, these coins are still warm. they cost 32 cents a pop to make. the mint makes nearly 2 million of them every day. do the math. about $600,000 a day to make them. and each one of these bags, 140,000 coins, $140,000,, more than 2,000 pounds. because almost nobody uses these things most go directly into storage. we found a bunch of them 100 miles down the road in a vault. here at the federal reserve in baltim
CSPAN
Jul 17, 2011 10:45pm EDT
apocalypse -- apocalyptic time coming. >> read your "new york times" and watch c-span in listen to npr. >> also though "wall street journal." >> get balanced news. [laughter] >> of friends at the "journal" will like that. >> if founders were magically transported today, what would shock them and what would they recognize? >> the question is interesting. i give talks to the audience here and inevitably what with jefferson think of affirmative action or george washington st. of the invasion of iraq? interesting questions. questions ordinary people ask. i don't think anyone in england would say what do they think about care rents government? so we have a connection with these founders. an intimate connection. . . >> very self-conscious say work negative at that. no person in our history was so self-conscious to be virtuous that turned me off as a synonym we don't use the term that way. this interested means of interested but partial because we cannot believe anybody is truly does interested. the only does interested people left because they run for office. but umpires and referees they ar
CNN
Jul 25, 2011 8:00am PDT
right. false. let's try out this one, a quote from president obama on npr. he said, ronald reagan repeatedly talked about how irresponsible it would be to allow the full faith and credit of the united states to be impaired in any way. what's verdict on that one? >> we rated this one mostly true. we dug into the historical documents and we found reagan did say the u.s. should pay its debts and it should not be in document now, presidents usually support increases to the debt ceiling while congress comp plain it we know that, rated mostly true. >> finally, it one from victoria jackson, she's comedian and tea party supporter. a clause niptd obama care bill, which is now law, gives obama the right to form a private army. what do we make of that? >> this one got the pants on fire. it seemed to be a serious commentary so we took it seriously and checked it. the health care law does expand the public health service, which has a uniformed commission corps, but doctors and nurses, not members of the military no private armies in the health care bill. >> she is a comedian, maybe she was jok
CSPAN
Jul 28, 2011 6:00am EDT
npr and participants expressed concern on the removal of credit ratings from our regulations and assert their credit ratings can be a valuable tool for assessing creditworthiness. many commenters believe that the simple approaches outlined in the option due to their lack of risk sensitivity create incentives for inappropriate risk arbitrage. however, commenters are also concerned that the more complex and risk sensitive approaches due to the depth and type of analysis that will be required posted disproportionate burden on small banks. commenters also expressed concern certain alternatives could create competitive inequities and inconsistencies with international capital standards established by the basel committee. these comments reflect the challenges that the occ and other federal banking agencies are facing as we work to implement 939a. we believe that with appropriate operational and due diligence requirements, credit ratings can be one vital factor to consider when evaluating the credit worthiness of financial instruments. in our view, our approach that -- rather than impos
FOX News
Jul 22, 2011 1:00pm EDT
president, you know, he's had interviews with npr, today he was in maryland at this university. is the president signaling that he may be getting close to agreeing to a deal that would raise this debt ceiling and that would have no tax hikes in it? >> reporter: well, he'll have to give his base something. he can't expect them to walk into this without even a symbolic tax increase. but, yes, obviously, what's happening now is the president is trying to soften the blow for his supporters being in a deep blue, very liberal state like maryland, being on a college campus be, rallying supporters in if a campaign-style event and, as you said, going on national public radio. these are all efforts on the president's part to reach out to liberals and say, look, i don't want to do a deal like this, but i have no choice so please understand me as i have to do this. martha: all right. we've got another piece of sound we want to play for everybody in relation to this. >> in order for us to solve the debt deficit problems, we've got to cut spending that we don't need, we have to eliminate programs th
Search Results 90 to 107 of about 123 (some duplicates have been removed)